Announcing a New Physician Training Program to Improve MS Care - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Announcing a New Physician Training Program to Improve MS Care

August 7, 2013

As part of the National MS Society’s commitment to support the training of physicians in the comprehensive care of people with MS, we are launching a new training program offering five-year awards to mentors and institutions to provide training for board-certified/eligible neurologists and physiatrists in MS comprehensive care. The program was developed in response to the critical need to increase the supply of physicians with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of MS. The goal is for fellows to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to provide the highest quality of care for individuals with MS. Applications are due September 30, 2013.

Read more about the new program, who is eligible, and how to apply.
  • A special informational teleconference for potential applicants will be held on Wednesday, August 21, 12:00 pm, Eastern   Time: 1-888-279-3775 code 0414#
  • Online applications are due September 30, 2013
  • Awards become effective: July 1, 2014
In addition to the new program, the Society continues to offer our existing individual MS Clinical Care Fellowships. The deadline for that program is August 15, 2013.  Read more 

New Award: The mentor-institution is responsible for the recruitment, selection, and training of postdoctoral fellows to pursue a clinical career specializing in the care of individuals with multiple sclerosis and similar disorders. The salary offered is $75,000 plus up to an additional 25% to cover fringe benefits. The term of training of each fellow will be determined by the mentor based on the period of time required for the training needed for development of an independent clinician. Support for a given fellow will not usually be provided for less than one year or more than three years.

Eligibility: The mentor must have an M.D., D.O., or equivalent degree, be board certified in neurology or physiatry, hold a faculty appointment or the equivalent at an accredited institution such as a university or teaching hospital, spend a minimum of 25% time on MS clinical care, have a clinical practice that includes relationships with a multidisciplinary care team, and work in a setting that can support an appropriate training environment for the postdoctoral fellow.

Read more about MS fellowship opportunities.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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