Information on Current and Completed Pregnancy Registries for MS Therapies - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Information on Current and Completed Pregnancy Registries for MS Therapies

August 5, 2013

In the original clinical trials of the disease-modifying therapies now approved for the treatment of MS women were required to use contraception during the trials and were discontinued from the trials if they became pregnant. As a result, there was little information on the effects of any of these medications on pregnancy. Since MS primarily affects women of childbearing age who can become pregnant unintentionally, it was considered extremely important to acquire information about how medications can affect pregnancy and unborn children.

In August 2002, the Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines requiring the manufacturers of these medications to develop pregnancy registries to monitor women who have taken one of these drugs within a week of becoming pregnant or while they were pregnant. Although none of the medications are approved for use during pregnancy, a woman may unintentionally become pregnant while on treatment. If the woman is unaware that she is pregnant, several weeks may pass before she stops the medication. The purpose of the registries has been to identify the outcomes of these pregnancies, including miscarriages and birth defects.

Information about the registries is provided here.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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