MS Research Progress Takes Center Stage at American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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MS Research Progress Takes Center Stage at American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting

May 5, 2011

Last month more than 10,000 researchers and practicing neurologists from around the world gathered at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) in Honolulu. Over 500 presentations related to multiple sclerosis, including a presentation by the 2011 John Dystel Prize for MS Research recipient, Dr. Brian Weinshenker (Mayo Clinic), related to his work and contributions toward understanding MS and the related disorder, neuromyelitis optica. National MS Society grantees, as well as grantees from the MS Society of Canada, NIH and other agencies, were among those presenting novel findings on many different approaches to stopping MS, restoring function, and ending the disease forever. Topics include CCSVI, laquinimod, a new trial in primary-progressive MS, Ginkgo biloba, advantages of early treatment and its long-term impact, treating sleep disorders, quality of life, MS genetics, the role of immune B cells, myelin repair, environmental risk factors and many more. Here are some highlights.

Download a full summary of highlights (.pdf)

Get free access to conference abstracts on the AAN Website by registering here

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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