Multiple Sclerosis Emerging Therapies Collaborative - UPDATE - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Multiple Sclerosis Emerging Therapies Collaborative - UPDATE

November 14, 2011

The Multiple Sclerosis Emerging Therapies Collaborative – which includes the members of the MS Coalition, the American Academy of Neurology, and the VA Multiple Sclerosis Centers of Excellence East and West – has as its mission:

To develop and disseminate timely, evidence-based resources
to persons affected by multiple sclerosis and health care professionals,
in order to promote optimal, individualized treatment of the disease
by facilitating effective communication and medical decision-making

The emergence of new MS therapies is both exciting and challenging for people living with MS, the clinicians who treat them, and the organizations that serve them. The groups that form this Collaborative have united to speak with a single voice in an effort to promote understanding and reduce confusion within the MS community concerning newly emerging MS therapies.

The Collaborative has established a dedicated, rapid-response website that will present downloadable information sheets for professional and lay readers about each newly-approved treatment. The information sheets, which include the known benefits and risks of each treatment as well as answers to commonly-asked questions, are written to complement one another in order to promote clinician-patient communication. Users can direct questions to emergingtherapies@ms-coalition.org.

New information about MS medications: The Collaborative has now posted information about the following medications and looks forward to adding additional resources in the near future:

Read more about the groups participating in this exciting new venture.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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