Help Needed to Encourage U.S. Senate to Support Record Funding for MS Research in Department of Defe - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Help Needed to Encourage U.S. Senate to Support Record Funding for MS Research in Department of Defense

July 7, 2014

With support from MS activists, in June, the U.S. House of Representatives agreed to an amendment that would double MS research funding for Fiscal Year 2015 in the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP). This amendment increased funding from $5 million to $10 million — the largest amount to date!

Watch Representative Barbara Lee (CA-13) in action (video on right) as she presents this amendment on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Senate still needs to act before final funding can be decided. MS activists (you!) should contact Senators — particularly members of the MS Caucus — and encourage them to match the House’s commitment. Email your Senators now or contact them via social media.

Background

MS activists advocated for Congress to establish the MS CDMRP as a new stream of research funding in 2008. As a result, Congress added MS as a CDMRP research priority, and since 2008, activists have engaged annually to ensure it has been funded. From 2008 to 2014, it has received $28 million in funding. The mission of the program is to support pioneering concepts and high impact research relevant to the prevention, etiology, pathogenesis, assessment and treatment of multiple sclerosis.

Learn more about the MS CDMRP.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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