Study: Bone Health is a Concern in Early MS - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Study: Bone Health is a Concern in Early MS

July 12, 2011

Researchers report that low bone mass was more prevalent among people newly diagnosed with MS, or those with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, a first episode of MS-like symptoms), than among controls without MS. The risk of bone loss had been known for people with MS, but this study shows that it can occur very early, even before MS has been diagnosed. Stine Marit Moen, MD, and colleagues at Oslo University Hospital report their findings in Neurology (2011;77:151-157).

The team measured bone density in several areas and the total body in 99 people newly diagnosed with MS, or those with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, a first episode of MS-like symptoms), compared to 159 controls without MS. They also administered a questionnaire concerning risk factors for osteoporosis (a disease that causes bones to thin). More than half of the people with MS or CIS had low bone mass, compared with 37.1% of controls, and low bone mass remained significantly lower in the spine and hip even after adjusting for other possible risk factors.

The authors conclude that this study “calls for an active approach to optimize bone health in early stages of MS.”

Read more about osteoporosis and MS and how you can build bone health.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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