UCSF's Jeffrey Gelfand, MD receives Society's Institutional Clinician Training Award - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Northern California Chapter works to improve the quality of life for the 84,000 people affected by MS in Northern California and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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UCSF's Jeffrey Gelfand, MD receives Society's Institutional Clinician Training Award

April 28, 2014

Congratulations to Jeffrey Gelfand, MD, of UCSF who has received the National MS Society's Institutional Clinician Training Award.

Consistent with its mission to move toward a world free of multiple sclerosis, the Society now offers the Institutional Clinician Training Award, a five-year award to mentors and institutions to provide training for board-certified/eligible neurologists and psychiatrists in MS specialist care. The goal is for fellows to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to provide the highest quality of care for individuals with MS.

This training focuses on all aspects of patient management, including monitoring disease course, utilizing treatments, managing symptoms, multidisciplinary care, as well as exposure to clinical research. The award’s unique flexibility allows the mentor and fellow to create a customized training plan tailored to the fellow’s background, interests and career goals that may span one to three years. And the Society’s five-year award gives mentors the certainty they need to attract and recruit the best candidates.

These awards will produce the next generation of clinical care specialists with a depth and breadth of knowledge required to provide exceptional care to people with MS well into the future.

Society Commits $29 Million for 83 New MS Research Projects

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed another $29 million to support an expected 83 new MS research projects and training awards. These are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever – for every single person with MS.

This financial commitment is the latest in the Society’s relentless research efforts to move us closer to a world free of MS, investing more than $50 million in 2014 alone to support over 380 new and ongoing studies around the world. So that no opportunity is wasted, the Society pursues all promising paths, while focusing on three priority areas:

  • progressive MS
  • nervous system repair
  • wellness and lifestyle

We are confident that with donor response to ongoing research successes, and continued focus on the NOW campaign, the crucial dollars needed to fund these and other research and clinical initiatives will be secured.

About the Northern California Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Northern California Chapter of the National MS Society was chartered in 1954 and provides comprehensive programs, services and advocacy to assist and empower the more than 84,000 people who are affected by MS annually. The chapter is also a driving force of research for the prevention, treatment and cure of MS and contributes funds to support 350 National MS Society research projects worldwide – including almost $12 million in critical MS research initiatives locally at J. David Gladstone Institutes, UCSF, Stanford, UC Davis and UC Berkeley. The Chapter has offices in San Francisco, Sacramento, Central Valley and Silicon Valley.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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