2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon

December 12, 2013

Searfoss

Farmington resident Jennifer Searfoss places a raffle ticket in one of the teacup drawing bags while attending the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast, which took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. Searfoss attended the event as a guest of her mother-in-law Selma Searfoss who, since 2002, has served as a WAMS luncheon table captain. More than 300 people attended the event, which raised over $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.

O'Toole
Simsbury residents Jennifer and Michael O’Toole pose at the start of the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast, which took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. The O’Tooles were honored at the event, receiving the Maureen Jessen Volunteer Award in recognition of their work on their Get Your Irish Up For MS event which has raised more than $94,000 since it began in 2008. Michael O’Toole began organizing the event in 2008 in honor of his mother who lived with multiple sclerosis for many years. The Maureen Jessen Volunteer Award is presented annually to an individual who illustrates a strong commitment to public service and unrelenting dedication to the fight against MS. More than 300 people attended the luncheon, which raised over $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
Robbin Goodskey
Avon resident Robbin Goodskey and her two daughters, Natalie, and, Lillian, pose at the start of the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast, which took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. Robbin, who served as a table captain at the women’s luncheon, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2006, 18 years after her mother, Barbara Byrne, was diagnosed with MS. Robbin, who helps raise awareness through her personal account of living life in the face of MS, also captains the Walk MS fundraising team, Robbin’s Hood. Natalie is a liberal arts major at the University of Connecticut. She will graduate in May. Lillian is a senior in high school. More than 300 people attended the luncheon, which raised over $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
Fillo
Harford Courant columnist MaryEllen Fillo poses with Larissa Nusser and Lisa Gerrol while attending the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast, which took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center, located inHartford. Fillo, the paper’s Java columnist, interviewed Nusser, the event’s keynote speaker, and Gerrol, who serves as the CEO and president of the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter. Fillo, who lives in Plainville, also guests daily on the Jerry Kristafer Show on 102.9 DRC-FM. Nusser, a resident of Staten Island, N.Y., is a certified yoga instructor as well as a certified life coach. She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2000. Nusser also teaches laughter yoga, the combination of unconditional laughing with yogic breathing, which she practices to remain upbeat and positive in response to the chronic illness she battles. More than 300 people attended the luncheon, which raised more than $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
Calabrese
West Hartford resident Ashley Calabrese browses the wares featured by various vendors participating at the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast, which took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center. Calabrese, a lobbyist with Updike, Kelly and Spellacy, P.C., located inHartford, attended the event with a colleague after receiving an invitation via Facebook. More than 300 people attended the 2013 WAMS luncheon, which raised over $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.
Bishop
Margaret Bishop, Coventry, and Judi Bigda, Manchester, pose while at the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast. The women attended as guests of Monica Marchese, a WAMS table captain and also a member of the 2014 WAMS planning committee. The luncheon took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center, located in Hartford. More than 300 people attended the luncheon, which raised more than $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
Raffle Media
Best friends Elizabeth Thomas, Columbia, and Faith Vicinanza, Wolcott, embrace just before taking their places for the 2013 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon, presented by Comcast. Thomas was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 25 years ago. In an ironic twist of fate, after being friends for more than 17 years, Vicinanza, too, was diagnosed with MS. Over the years Vicinanza had attended multiple fundraisers in support of Thomas’ battle against MS. The pair now step out together each year for Walk MS, championing their shared passion to help fund a cure. The luncheon took place Friday, Dec. 6, at the Connecticut Convention Center, located in Hartford. More than 300 people attended the luncheon, which raised more than $55,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the 2014 Walk MS, presented by Travelers, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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