35th Annual MS Dinner Of Champions - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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35th Annual MS Dinner Of Champions

November 20, 2013

Timpanelli
Stratford resident Chris Timpanelli, Esq., poses with Lisa Gerrol, president, National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, just before the start of the 35th Annual MS Dinner of Champions, which took place on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the Hilton Stamford Hotel, in Stamford. Timpanelli, who serves on the MS Dinner of Champions committee, battles multiple sclerosis. More than 300 people attended the black tie optional event, which raised more than $360,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
FAUL
Danbury resident Jeff Faul raises his paddle to bid on a XLVIII Super Bowl VIP experience, which includes VIP admission for two to a celebrity dinner party to be held Saturday, Feb. 1, tickets to a pregame extravaganza and tickets to the Feb. 2 Super Bowl game. Faul, president and chief executive officer of Danbury-based Nukem, and his wife, Elsie, landed the XLVIII Super Bowl VIP experience participating in the live auction featured at the 35th Annual MS Dinner of Champions, which took place on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the Hilton Stamford Hotel, in Stamford. Jeff Faul was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease, in 2001. He and his wife are longtime supporters of the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter. More than 300 people attended the black tie optional event, which raised more than $360,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.
RichterBranda
Newington resident Michael Branda poses with former New York Rangers goaltender Michael Richter, a resident of Greenwich. The pair attended the 35th Annual MS Dinner of Champions, which took place on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the Hilton Stamford Hotel, in Stamford. Richter, a U. S. Hockey Hall of Fame member, received the 2013 J. Walter Kennedy Memorial Award, an award given each year by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, in recognition of the extraordinary accomplishments of gifted athletes and their championship teams. Branda, an avid hockey fan, serves as development manager with the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter. More than 300 people attended the black tie optional event, which raised more than $360,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.
Venture
In a moment of presto change-o, Greenwich residents Stuart Retour, Jan Kelley and Devan Chiruigi take a breather from behind the lens to pose for a camera. The trio, all of whom work for Venture Photography ofGreenwich, were vendor participants at the 35th Annual MS Dinner of Champions, which took place on Nov. 20, at the Hilton Stamford Hotel, inStamford. Dinner guests were offered opportunities to have a professional photo taken for a nominal donation to support the National MS Society and its efforts. Retour and Kelley serve as exhibition reps for the Greenwich-based Venture Photography. Chiruigi is a professional photographer who has been with Venture since its inception seven years ago. More than 300 people attended the black tie optional event, which raised more than $360,000. Funds raised through National MS Society events ensure ongoing scientific research to help develop better treatments and a cure for multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Funds also provide for the continuation of programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to the 6,000 residents in the state battling multiple sclerosis. For more information on Venture Photography, visitwww.venturephotography.com. For more information on MS, its effects and the many ways to help make a difference, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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