Community Day With The New Britain Rock Cats - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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Community Day With The New Britain Rock Cats

June 26, 2013

goggins

CUTLINE: While at the May 17 MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, Middletown resident Kathy Goggins poses with her son Peter, 14, daughter Kasey, 11, and husband, Mike. Kathy is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. The Goggins family recently stepped out for the annual Walk MS in Cheshire on April 21. Kathy heads up the fundraising team, Doches, which is Gaelic for hope. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.1 million toward a $1.4 million goal. To donate to team Doches, or for more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

jacinto

CUTLINE: Cromwell residents Carlos and Renee Jacinto take in a ballgame at the May 17 MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, who played the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. Renee was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease, in 1990. More than 6,000 people in Connecticut also battle multiple sclerosis. Two hundred guests came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. The Jacintos are longtime members of the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, serving as MS activists at the chapter’s annual MS Action Day, held each March at the Connecticut State Capitol Building in Hartford. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

emmons

CUTLINE: Terry Emmons, Portland, and Nancy Marino, Hamden, pose while at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 17. Emmons is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents living with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the game between the New Britain Rock Cats and the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

henowitz

CUTLINE: North Haven resident Anita Henowitz (center), Darleen Bowne, Hamden, and Spencer Mussman, New Britain, pose while at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 17. Henowitz is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents living with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease. Henowitz and Mussman have been friends for 30 years. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the game between the New Britain Rock Cats and the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

hewitt

CUTLINE: Middletown resident Carey Hewitt poses with his 20 year old son, Shawn, while enjoying a barbeque dinner at the May 17 MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats. Diagnosed in 1998, Carey is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

O'Coin

CUTLINE: Windsor residents John O’ Coin pictured with granddaughter Brooke-lyn O’Coin and girlfriend Lisa Wetherby take in a ballgame at the May 17 MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats. Wetherby was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease, in 2004. More than 6,000 people in Connecticut also battle multiple sclerosis. Two hundred guests came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, an MS program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org

 

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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