Hebron Resident To Host The One Show - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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Hebron Resident To Host The One Show

October 11, 2011

NEW BRITAIN, Conn. – Hebron resident David Bell will host The One Show rock concert on Friday, Nov. 11, at Trinity on Main in New Britain. A portion of proceeds from the show will benefit the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, in support of Bell’s sister, Betsy Sammarco, who lives with multiple sclerosis.

Bell helps promote the local classic rock band The New Remains, based in the Hartford area. Recently, Bell decided he wanted to put on a show and also take the opportunity to raise funds for MS.

“I thought what a great opportunity to have a show and help raise some money and awareness for MS at the same time,” said Bell, who works as an international sales manager for Fender guitars. “The guys were all talking and saying ‘wow 11/11/11, that’s pretty cool, it could be like the one show’ and that’s how we got the ball rolling.”

Bell’s sister Sammarco, a New Canaan resident, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008. More than 6,000 Connecticut residents, like Sammarco, live with the potentially debilitating effects of MS. Symptoms can include numbness and tingling in the limbs, difficulty with vision and speech and in severe cases, complete paralysis. The cause is unknown and, as a result, there is no cure for MS. The progress, severity or specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot be predicted.

the one show

Hebron resident David Bell and his sister, Betsy Sammarco, a New Canaan resident, hold up a tee displaying their Strike Out MS Walk team logo. Sammarco lives with multiple sclerosis and Bell is one of her biggest supporters, raising funds and awareness to keep research moving forward toward a cure. Bell will host The One Show, featuring The New Remains, Friday, Nov. 11, at Trinity on Main in New Britain. A portion of the proceeds benefit the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, and those it serves.  

Since his sister’s diagnosis, Bell has become actively involved with the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, participating in both the Walk MS and Bike MS events in Westport. But Bell, who walks on the Strike Out MS fundraising team and cycles on the Oven Roasted Sneakers fundraising team, felt the urge to do more.

“Any opportunity I have to help raise awareness or money I’ll take advantage of,” said Bell. “I’m hoping this event can raise $500. If I could do something every day to help the cause I would.”

This resolve led to the creation of The One Show, featuring The New Remains and special guest, Mercury. The One Show will be held Friday, Nov. 11, at Trinity on Main in New Britain. Tickets for the show are $15, a portion of proceeds going toward the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, and those it serves. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. with the show to start at 8 p.m.

For more information or to purchase tickets for The One Show, please visit www.trinityonmain.org/the-one-show. For more information on multiple sclerosis, please visit www.ctfightsMS.org

10/11/11

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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