MIDDLETOWN EAGLE SCOUT CANDIDATE TO HOST CHARITY CONCERT FOR MS - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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MIDDLETOWN EAGLE SCOUT CANDIDATE TO HOST CHARITY CONCERT FOR MS

June 1, 2012

Middletown High School junior Kirk Hart will host the Multiple Sclerosis Charity Concert, Sunday, June 10, at 7 p.m., at Middletown High School. Hart, a member of Boy Scout Troop 10 in Middletown, hopes to use the free informative concert to raise awareness on multiple sclerosis. Hart’s great uncle, Glen Adams, lived with MS. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, please visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

MIDDLETOWN, Conn. – Middletown High School junior Kirk Hart, 16, has seen the potentially debilitating effects of multiple sclerosis.

He watched his great uncle, successful musician Glen Adams, lose his ability to play as a result of his MS. In 2012, Adams passed away from complications due to the effects of his MS. Hart also has other family members who live with the disease.

“Multiple sclerosis is something I’m very familiar with,” said Hart, whose mother, Lynette Coleman, works as associate vice president of programs and services for the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter. “However, many of my peers don’t know anything about it.”

When Hart, who is pursuing an Eagle Scout ranking, the highest rank attainable by the Boy Scouts of America, discovered that he had an upcoming community service project requirement with his Boy Scout troop, he jumped at the opportunity to inform others about MS.

On Sunday, June 10, at 7 p.m., Hart will host the Multiple Sclerosis Charity Concert at Middletown High School. Hart hopes the free informative concert will help raise awareness for MS among his fellow students, as well as the general public.

“I want people with MS to come, relax and enjoy the music,” said Hart, who will emcee the event, “but the main goal is for everyone to learn about this disease.”

More than 6,000 Connecticut residents are affected by multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease affecting the central nervous system. The cause is unknown and, as a result, there is currently no cure for MS. Symptoms can include, among other things, numbness in the limbs, difficulties with vision and speech, stiffness, loss of mobility and, in some sever cases, total paralysis. The progress, severity, and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot be predicted.

 Informational materials on multiple sclerosis will also be available at the event.

Hart coordinated the concert with assistance from Marco Gaylord, director of fine arts for Middletown High School, and Kim Everson, his music teacher. The concert will feature various student musical groups and singers, including a tuba quintet.

The Multiple Sclerosis Charity Concert will be Sunday, June 10, at 7 p.m., at Middletown High School, located at 200 Larosa Lane in Middletown. The concert is free to attend.

For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

6/1/12

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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