MS Research Night May 3 - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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MS Research Night May 3

May 11, 2012

Tanuja Chitnis, M.D., gives the latest on MS Research

  

On Thursday, May 3, the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, hosted MS Research Night at the Hartford MarriottRocky Hill. Featured speaker Tanuja Chitnis, M.D., director of the Partners Pediatric MS Center at the Mass General Hospital for Children.

Dr. Chitnis has had a longstanding interest in pediatric multiple sclerosis. She is the chair of the International Pediatric MS Study Group (IPMSSG), and has written many publications and reviews related to multiple sclerosis. She is actively involved in several research projects to help better understand and treat MS in children.

 

research night 1
From left to right: Lisa Gerrol, president, National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter; Christian and Liliane Haub, Greenwich; and Tanuja Chitnis, M.D.; pose at MS Research Night, Thursday, May 3, at the Hartford Marriott Rocky Hill. Liliane Haub opened the evening sharing her compelling story of overcoming the challenges of her multiple sclerosis to complete this year’s New York City marathon. In 2010, the Haub’s pledged to donate $1 million to MS research. Chitnis, director of the Partners Pediatric MS Center at the Mass General Hospital for Children, spoke on the latest in multiple sclerosis research. “It is a very exciting time in MS research and treatment,” said Chitnis, who specializes in treating pediatric MS. “Our children should not be able to pronounce multiple sclerosis in the future.” For the latest in MS research, please visitwww.nationalmssociety.org. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

research night 2
From left to right: Cromwell sisters Brittany, 21, Rachel, 18, and Lindsay Noble, 16, pose at MS Research Night, Thursday, May 3, at the Hartford Marriott Rocky Hill, in Rocky Hill. Lindsay, who was diagnosed with MS when she was 13 years old, has served as a Walk MS spokesperson for the past two years with her mother, Judy. Tanuja Chitnis, M.D., director of the Partners Pediatric MS Center at the Mass General Hospital for Children and also Lindsay’s doctor, spoke on the latest in multiple sclerosis research. “It is a very exciting time in MS research and treatment,” said Chitnis, who specializes in treating pediatric MS. “Our children should not be able to pronounce multiple sclerosis in the future.” For the latest in MS research, please visitwww.nationalmssociety.org. For more information on Walk MS, or to donate to Lindsay’s Loafers, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.

 

research night 3
Dorothy Contrasanto and her son, Jay, pose at MS Research Night,Thursday, May 3, at the Hartford Marriott Rocky Hill, inRocky Hill. Jay, 21, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis two years ago. MS Research Night featured Tanuja Chitnis, M.D., director of the Partners Pediatric MS Center at the Mass General Hospital for Children, who spoke on the latest in multiple sclerosis research. According to Chitnis, who specializes in treating pediatric MS, “It is a very exciting time in MS research and treatment. Our children should not be able to pronounce the names of these drugs nor multiple sclerosis in the future.” For the latest in MS research, please visit www.nationalmssociety.org. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

research night 4
Kara Preston, New Britain; Robin Komisar, Woodbridge; and MegAnne Staubley, Bristol; pose at MS Research Night,Thursday, May 3, at the Hartford Marriott Rocky Hill, in Rocky Hill. Komisar, a longtime supporter of the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, served on the 2012 MS Taste of Hope steering committee, and is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. Preston and Staubley both work for the Connecticut Chapter.  MS Research Night featured Tanuja Chitnis, M.D., director of the Partners Pediatric MS Center at the Mass General Hospital for Children, who spoke on the latest in multiple sclerosis research. According to Chitnis, who specializes in treating pediatric MS, “It is a very exciting time in MS research and treatment. Our children should not be able to pronounce the names of these drugs nor multiple sclerosis in the future.” For the latest in MS research, please visit www.nationalmssociety.org. For more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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