More Than 200 Attend MS Community Day With The New Britain Rock Cats - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Skip to navigation Skip to content

News

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

Share

More Than 200 Attend MS Community Day With The New Britain Rock Cats

May 23, 2012

Gratiously funded by the Hayley's Hope and Michaela's Miracle MS Memorial Fund.

More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium on Friday, May 11, to watch the New Britain Rock Cats takeon the Reading Phillies. The program, generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund,featured a barbeque on the left field patio prior to the game, which was won 4-1 by the Rock Cats, and was a rare occurrence of a losing pitcher allowing no hits.

 Goggins
Middletown resident Kathy Goggins poses with her son Peter, 13, and daughter Kasey, 10, at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Kathy is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. The Goggins family also participated in the annual Travelers Walk MS in Cheshire as part of team Doches, which is Gaelic for hope. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.2 million toward a $1.45 million goal. To donate to team Doches, or for more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 Comparones
Southington resident Joanne Comparone poses with her daughters Hannah, left, 13, and Hailey, 9, at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Joanne is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by theHayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Comparone, a nurse currently on disability, recently moved into a new home in Southington and received assistance from the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for her oil heat. She raised money for the Travelers Walk MS in April, however was unable to participate due to an exacerbation of her MS symptoms and was unable to walk. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.2 million toward a $1.45 million goal. To donate to Joanne’s Walk MS efforts, or for more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 Roucolet
Linda Roucoulet, (seated) Hartford, poses with niece Mia Roucoulet, 7, Bristol, son Spencer, 8, and sister-in-law Linda at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Linda, a longtime Walk MS volunteer, is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Linda’s family formed the Simione’s Walkmonkeys fundraising team in her honor and raised more than $1,000 at the Travelers Walk MS in West Hartford. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.2 million toward a $1.45 million goal. The Walkmonkeys, who wear hand-knitted monkey hats which are available to the public with a team donation of $10, will convert to Ridemonkeys, for the upcoming Bike MS: Red Thread+Steelcase Ride, Sunday, June 3, inWindsor. To donate to the Walkmonkeys or Ridemonkeys, or for more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 edwoods
Three generations of the Edwoods family pose at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Pictured is grandfather Dick Edwoods, East Hampton; son Andrew, Glastonbury; and granddaughter Ella, 18 months. Dick is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by theHayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Formore information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 Johnsons Rock Cats
Milford resident Valarie Johnson poses with her daughter Christal at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Valarie is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. “It’s nice that you can come to an event like this to be with the MS community,” said Valarie “It’s so important for us, there’s so many of us living with MS. It’s great to meet people and have a good time.” The Johnson’s also participated in the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter’s Travelers Walk MS as part of VALS team, which stands for Val’s Amazing Life Supports. The pair also plan to volunteer for the MS Motorcycle Ride on Sunday, July 22, at the Oakdale Theater in Wallingford. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.2 million toward a $1.45 million goal. To donate to VALS team, or for more information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 rockcats kids
Bristol friends Anthony Selvaggi, 12; Carley Wright, 12; and Angela Faitani, 11; pose at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Angela’s mother Gail is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Formore information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 blakeslees
Hamden family Dan, Emily and Ryan Blakeslee pose at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Emily is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. “Hosting on an event like this makes all the difference,” said Blakeslee. “It’s a great way to get the word out about MS.” More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Formore information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 sandy and lisa
left to right: New Britain Rock Cats mascot Sandy poses with Lisa Gerrol, president of the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, and Jamiah Gardner, 7, Bloomfield, at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Jamiah’s aunt, Diane Caldwell, is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. Formore information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

 

 sayers
Ryan Sayers, 5, West Haven, claps his thunder sticks with a little help from dad, Ken, at MS Community Day with the New Britain Rock Cats, held Friday, May 11. Ryan’s mother Denise (right) is one of the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents who live with multiple sclerosis. More than 200 people came out to New Britain Stadium for MS Community Day, a program generously funded by the Hayley’s Hope and Michaela’s Miracle MS Memorial Fund. The day featured a barbeque prior to the Rock Cats taking on the Reading Phillies. The Sayers family also participated in the Travelers Walk MS in West Haven as part of team Ryan’s Hope. To date, Walk MS has raised more than $1.2 million toward a $1.45 million goal. To donate to team Ryan’s Hope, or formore information on multiple sclerosis and available programs and services offered by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, to those in the state battling MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

5/23/12

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Share

Chapter Home News
Master Page Does Not Exist