Vacation Week 2013 (1) - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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Vacation Week 2013

June 14, 2013

Penny Chapman

CUTLINE:  Penny Chapman, Glastonbury, shows off her catch, a whopping fresh water bass, while fishing off the dock at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Chapman is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure.  Chapman, who worked for many years as a janitor in the Glastonbury public school system, was diagnosed with MS 27 years ago.  This is Chapman’s third year attending MS Vacation Week. She says her favorite activities include swimming, fishing and painting pottery. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Trapani

CUTLINE:  Rick Trapani, Seymore, prepares to do a little kayaking while at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located inHebron. Trapani is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure. Trapani, who for many years worked for Sikorsky Aircraft in Stratford, was diagnosed with MS in 1985. Despite the disabling effects of his MS, when at camp, Trapani enjoys kayaking and fishing. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visitwww.ctfightsMS.org.

gail carleton

CUTLINE:  Gail Carleton, Franklin, Mass., paints pottery during the arts and crafts activity held Monday at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  Carleton is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The weeklong holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut and Greater New England chapters, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Carleton, 51, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1992. When at camp, she says she enjoys arts and crafts, swimming and visiting with other campers. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.msnewengland.org.

Janet Kleya

CUTLINE:  Janet Kleya, Uxbridge, Mass., shows off her catch while fishing off the dock at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  Kleya is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The six-day holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut and Greater New England chapters, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Kleya, who worked for many years at General Motors, was diagnosed with MS in 1986. She says her favorite camp activities include kayaking and fishing. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter, assists people living with MS, visitwww.msnewengland.org.

Joe Siana

CUTLINE:  Joe Siana, Enfield, fishes off the dock while at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Siana is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure. Siana, a native of Canton, was diagnosed with MS in 1984. He says his favorite thing about camp is catching up with old friends and doing a little fishing. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Barbara Orlanski

CUTLINE:  Barbara Orlanski, Trumbull, prepares to enter the pool at this week’s MS Vacation Week, which is being held at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Orlanski, originally from Poland,  is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, June 9 through June 14. The weeklong holiday is an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Orlanski, 67, a onetime graphic designer and the married mother of three grown children, was diagnosed with MS in 1993. She has attended MS Vacation Week for the past two years. Orlanski says her favorite activities include swimming and anything held out-of-doors. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Carol Slack

CUTLINE:  Carol Slack, Middletown, paints pottery during the arts and crafts activity held this week at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Slack is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The six-day holiday is an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure. Slack was diagnosed with MS in 2010. She has attend MS Vacation Week for the past three years and was named this year to receive the Susan A. Hyams Memorial Scholarship, a scholarship program established in 2003 by Jeffery Hyams, M.D., as a tribute to his late wife, who battled multiple sclerosis. The scholarship enabled Slack to attend the weeklong  respite at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks Recreation Center. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Tom Maloney

CUTLINE:  Tom Maloney, Meriden,  listens to a few tunes on his iPod while in the lobby of Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Maloney is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure.  Maloney, who for 24 years taught music, theater and karate at Francis T. Maloney High School in Meriden, was diagnosed with MS in 1985. He is a longtime volunteer with the chapter, serving as an MS activist lobbying legislators on issues affecting people with disability. Despite the disabling effects of his MS, Maloney stays busy teaching piano and working part-time at Target. This is Maloney’s first time attending MS Vacation Week. To date, he has participated in fishing, kayaking and swimming.  For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Mary Bois

CUTLINE:  Mary Bois, Kensington, poses with Molly Sweeney, Hebron, above the boat docks at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  Bois, the mother of three grown children, is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The weeklong holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Bois, who has been coming to camp since 1999,  was diagnosed with MS in 1982. Sweeney, who is a sophomore at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass., is currently conducting a public relations internship with the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter.  For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Brian Shebell

CUTLINE:  Brian Shebell, Turners Falls, Mass., enjoys a breather before taking to the kayaks during the boating activities held at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  Shebell, a retired paper mill machine operator, is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The six-day holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut and Greater New England chapters, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Shebell, who has been coming to camp for 10 years, was diagnosed with MS in 1987. He says his favorite camp activities include boating and karaoke. His breakout song is “Born To Be Wild,” a tune he insists is a popular request among fellow campers. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.msnewengland.org.

Terry Melket

CUTLINE:  Terry Melket, Canton, Mass., paints pottery during the arts and crafts activity held Monday at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  Melket, 55, who has lived in a nursing home for the past 16 years, is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The six-day holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut and Greater New England chapters, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. Melket, who uses a powered wheel chair for mobility, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was 32 years old. When at camp, she says she enjoys arts and crafts and visiting with other campers. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.msnewengland.org.

Dora Laudenslager

CUTLINE:  Dora Laudenslager, Dayville, paints pottery during the arts and crafts activity held this week at Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron. Laudenslager is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, June 9 through June 14. The six-day holiday is an annual program hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease for which there is no cure. Laudenslager, 48, was diagnosed with MS in 2010. She has attend MS Vacation Week for the past three years. Laudenslager, a wife and mother of a son, says her favorite aspect of camp is visiting old friends. For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Freddie McKoy

CUTLINE:  Freddie McKoy, Dorchester, Mass., decorates a quilt square during the arts and crafts activities held Thursday at Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks, a fully accessible, barrier-free summer camp located in Hebron, Conn.  McKoy, a retired personal shopper with the onetime department store Filene’s, is one of 50 campers attending this year’s MS Vacation Week, which takes place June 9 through June 14. The weeklong holiday is an annual program, hosted by the National MS Society, Connecticut and Greater New England chapters, for people living with the disabling effects of multiple sclerosis, a disease for which there is no cure. McKoy, who has been coming to camp since 1998,  has battled MS for many years. He says his favorite camp activities include arts and crafts and participating in the talent show. This year McKoy performed a gospel song, “I Need You To Survive.” For more information on MS, it’s effects and the many ways the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter, assists people living with MS, visit www.msnewengland.org.

 

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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