Winsted Man Lives Life Large Despite Disease - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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Winsted Man Lives Life Large Despite Disease

May 10, 2012

Dwayne Paige hosting motorcycle fundraiser

WINSTED, Conn. – Nothing can keep Dwayne Paige from riding a motorcycle, not even disability.

Since the former Naval engineer was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1990, Paige has been robbed of mobility. Today he uses crutches to get around. No longer able to ride a standard motorcycle, Paige decided to build his own trike.

“Nothin’ really stops me,” said the defiant Paige. “It’s like the National MS Society says, ‘just keep moving,’ and that’s what I’m doing.”

dwayne
Dwayne Paige was recently featured in a National MS Society ad campaign in New York City with renowned photographer Martin Schoeller. Paige will host the second annual Mac Daddy’s Bike Run on Saturday, May 19, at Billy Ray’s Café in Winsted. The fee for the ride is a $20 donation to the National MS Society. Paige has also recently been named spokesperson for the Connecticut Chapter MS Motorcycle Ride on Sunday, July 22, at the Oakdale Theater in Wallingford. For more information on the second annual Mac Daddy’s Bike Run, please contact Dwayne Paige at 860-307-3658. For more information on multiple sclerosis, or to register for the MS Motorcycle Ride, please visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

Seldom does a decent day go by without the roar of Paige’s bright blue 2004 Custom Chrome Nemesis Harley Davidson, customized with dual back wheels, holders for Paige’s crutches and even a beer tap suicide shifter.

“My best educated guess is it took me about 1,000 beers to build,” said Paige, who also estimates the back-end cost around $10,000. “Listen, MS slows us down, but it’s not stopping me.”

Paige lives his life by the motto LV, LF, LG – or “Live Life Large,” and he will do just that on Saturday, May 19, when he hosts his second annual Mac Daddy’s Bike Run, at Billy Ray’s in Winsted.

The fundraiser, which benefits the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, leaves Billy Ray’s Café at 11:30 a.m. and returns at 2 p.m. for a cookout and entertainment by Kevin and Pete. The cost of the ride is a $20 donation to the Connecticut Chapter.

More than 6,000 Connecticut residents, like Paige, live with multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Symptoms can include, among other things, numbness and tingling in the extremities, difficulties with vision and speech, extraordinary fatigue, stiffness in the limbs, and in extreme cases, complete paralysis.

Pre-registration for the second annual Mac Daddy’s Bike Run is on-going at Billy Ray’s Café, located at, 19 Rowley Street, Winsted. Registration the day of the ride begins at 10 a.m.

Paige has also been named spokesperson for the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, MS Motorcycle Ride on Sunday, July 22, at the Oakdale Theater in Wallingford.

For more information on the second annual Mac Daddy’s Bike Run, please contact Dwayne Paige at 860-307-3658. For more information on multiple sclerosis, or to register for the MS Motorcycle Ride, please visit www.ctfightsMS.org.

5/10/12

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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