Women Against MS Luncheon Returns To Hartford - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

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Women Against MS Luncheon Returns To Hartford

September 28, 2011

HARTFORD, Conn. - The Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS (WAMS) Luncheon will be held Friday, Nov. 4, at the Marriott Hartford Downtown in Hartford.

The Women Against MS Luncheon is an event in which women to come together to demonstrate their support to a friend or family member who is affected by multiple sclerosis.According to statistics, three times as many women are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis as are men. As a result, women across the nation now come together annually, state by state and chapter by chapter, to learn, through inspirational personal accounts, about the devastating effects and the latest advancements in care. These same women, dedicated to joining the fight against MS, raise critically-needed funds to ensure continued scientific research to find a cure. The dynamic groups of women are known as Women Against MS or WAMS.

WAMS HART
Singer-songwriter Kristie Salerno Kent poses with Karen Butler, vice president of communications with the National MS Society, Connecticut Chapter, at the 2010 WAMS luncheon. Salerno Kent, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1999, spoke at the event about her personal battle against the disease and performed songs from her album, Believe. The 2010 WAMS luncheon attracted 350 guests and raised more than $66,000. The 2011 Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon will be held Friday, Nov. 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Marriott Hartford Downtown in Hartford, Conn. To register or become a table captain, please visitwww.ctfightsMS.org

 

For the first time ever, the event will feature an exclusive boutique shopping from 10 a.m. to noon. Guests will have the opportunity to shop among local merchants who will display clothing, jewelry and much more. At noon guests will move on to the lunch and program portion of the event, which features keynote speaker Maureen Manley former U.S. Cycling Team National Champion. Manley will share how the sudden onset of multiple sclerosis changed her focus in life and started her on a new journey. NBC Connecticut anchor Lisa Carberg will return to serve as mistress of ceremonies.

Funds raised by events such as the WAMS luncheon ensure ongoing scientific research to find a cure and provide for the continuation of vital programs and services offered by the chapter to the more than 6,000 Connecticut residents affected by MS.

The Greater Hartford NBC Connecticut Women Against MS Luncheon will be held Friday, Nov. 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Marriott Hartford Downtown in Hartford, Conn. The lunch and program will begin at noon.Media partners include NBC Connecticut and Clear Channel and The River 105.9.

For more information on the WAMS luncheon, please contact Elizabeth Sulick at 860-913-2550 ext. 52524, or elizabeth.sulick@nmss.org.

9/28/11

About the Connecticut Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Connecticut Chapter strives to provide knowledge and assistance to help people with MS and their families maintain the highest possible quality of life. These goals are achieved through vital national and local programs.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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