The MS Center of Atlanta Partners with the National MS Society as Sponsor Walk MS: Georgia 2013 - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Georgia Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in the state of Georgia and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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The MS Center of Atlanta Partners with the National MS Society as Sponsor Walk MS: Georgia 2013

April 17, 2013

ATLANTA (April 17, 2013) The National MS Society-Georgia Chapter proudly announces that The MS Center of Atlanta will continue its legacy of support as a Bronze Sponsor of Walk MS: Georgia 2013.

“The MS Center of Atlanta has been a loyal partner of Walk MS for many years. We are honored they have chosen to continue their support in 2013,” said Georgia Chapter Director of Special Events, Ailena Parramore. “Sponsors of Walk MS, like the MS Center of Atlanta, are visible, recognized, and celebrated throughout our events for their partnership and commitment to achieving a world free of multiple sclerosis. Together we Will make a difference, and one day we will achieve a world free of MS.”

Walk MS is the rallying point of the MS Movement, a community coming together to raise funds and celebrate hope for the future. The Georgia Chapter hosts nine Walk MS events throughout the state of Georgia with companies, large and small, generously offering their support to engage the community in a successful and inspiring way. Money raised through this event benefits the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and its mission to create a world free of MS. For more information on the ride or sponsorship, please visit www.walkMSgeorgia.org

ABOUT MS
Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.1 million people worldwide.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY
The National Multiple Sclerosis Society helps each person address the challenges of living with MS. In 2011 alone, through our national office and 50-state network of chapters, we devoted $164 million to programs and services that improved the lives of more than one million people. To move us closer to a world free of MS, the Society also invested $40 million to support more than 325 new and ongoing research projects around the world. We are People who want to do something about MS now. Join the movement at nationalMSsociety.org.

The Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization providing comprehensive health care services for people living with multiple sclerosis. Founded in 2001 by William H. Stuart, M.D., MSCA provides patients and their families with access to the latest in research, education and treatment options. In addition to medical care, the center offers patients and families access to peer-support, self-help groups, a peer telephone support and mentor program, volunteer visitor network and patient support services. The Center is committed to providing comprehensive care to MS patients with consideration given to the financial impact the treatment will have on the patient and their family. Patient Assistance is provided to qualified patients through funds and resources available at the Center and throughout the community. Please refer to our Patient Registration Form.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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