Self-Employed Man Does Good, And Gets An Awesome Bike Because Of It! - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Skip to navigation Skip to content

News

In Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont, the Greater New England Chapter works to improve quality of life for individuals and families affected by MS; and raises funds for cutting-edge MS research to stop disease progression, restore lost function, and end MS forever.

Share

Self-Employed Man Does Good, And Gets An Awesome Bike Because Of It!

June 26, 2014

PHOTO: (Joe Grillo) left to right: Marty Miserandino of Fit Werx and bike winner Joe Grillo

“I thought someone was playing a joke on me.”

That was Joe Grillo’s reaction when told he had just won a brand new Cervelo R3-105 bike worth $2,500 and a fitting worth $250. Grillo, of Derry, NH, is training for Bike MS: Cape Cod Getaway, a 150-mile ride to raise money for multiple sclerosis, June 28-29. He qualified for a chance to win the bike in a fundraising contest. About 850 people qualified, so Grillo was shocked to learn, he was the lucky winner.

“I’m so excited; it’s definitely an upgrade from what I have.”

Grillo’s current bike is seven years old and has about 5,000 miles on it. He wanted to replace it, but couldn’t.

“Every year I look at bikes, but being self-employed, I just couldn’t justify buying a new one. It was a want, not a need.”

Thanks to the generosity of Fit Werx of Peabody, MA and Waitsfield, VT, which donated the bike and fitting, Grillo will soon be riding his custom-fit, brand new Cervelo bike.

“Joe was awesome!!!” said Marty Miserandino of Fit Werx. “We know Joe is going to love the new bike and (we are) happy to help anyone who is interested in enjoying cycling even more.

The folks at Fit Werx have another reason to support the National MS Society.

“Stopping MS is important to our clients and to us personally,” said Miserandino. “Co-Owner Dean Phillips’ sister Marleigh lives with MS and we proud to support her, the cause, and the thousands of riders raising funds to get rid of MS forever!”

Marleigh Brown is riding her fifth Bike MS: Cape Cod Getaway this year. She is one of about 40 participants in the “I Ride with MS” campaign, sponsored by Genzyme, a Sanofi company. These cyclists wear a special jersey identifying them as having MS.

“For me, spreading awareness was empowering,” said Brown about wearing the “I Ride with MS” jersey last year. “It gave me some sense of control that I could do something.”

More than 2,000 riders will leave UMass Boston this Saturday on the two-day ride to Provincetown. Bike MS: Cape Cod Getaway is presented by EMD Serono and Pfizer. The money raised goes to the National MS Society, and supports MS research and services.

This will be Grillo’s 11th Bike MS ride. He doesn’t have a close friend or relative with the disease. He just likes being able to help others, while having a fun ride to the Cape.

“It’s a good thing and I feel good about it.”

If you would like to donate to Joe Grillo or any other rider go to www.bikemsgne.org.

 

 

About the Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The National MS Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The Society’s Greater New England Chapter serves 21,000 individuals and families affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and by contacting the National MS Society at www.MSnewengland.org, or 1 800 FIGHT MS (344 4867).

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Share


Chapter Home News
Master Page Does Not Exist