Baseball & Bonding: Kids with MS Meet at Fenway Park - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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In Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont, the Greater New England Chapter works to improve quality of life for individuals and families affected by MS; and raises funds for cutting-edge MS research to stop disease progression, restore lost function, and end MS forever.

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Baseball & Bonding: Kids with MS Meet at Fenway Park

August 28, 2014

“It’s amazing to know I’m not alone,” says Luis Reyes, 15, of Boston.

“It’s exciting to be at Fenway with others like me,” said Victoria Esselman, 17, of Medford, Mass.

On Saturday, August 23, Esselman was one of 15 kids with multiple sclerosis and their family members, who were treated to a picnic lunch and a Red Sox game at storied Fenway Park in Boston.

MS (multiple sclerosis) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Although MS  most commonly occurs in adults, it is sometimes diagnosed in children and adolescents. Estimates suggest that only 8,000 to 10,000 children in the US have MS.

For kids, having a chronic disease can make them feel alone.  That’s why the National MS Society teamed up with the Partners Pediatric MS Center at MassGeneral Hospital for Children and the Pediatric MS Center at Children’s Hospital to create “Kids Get MS Too.”  Using recreational activities as a backdrop, Kids Get MS Too provides networking and learning opportunities to kids and their parents individually and as a group.

“It’s an opportunity for children and adolescents with MS, and their families, to meet each other, share their thoughts and experiences and see that there are others out there like them,” said Linda Guiod, Exec. V.P. Chapter Programs, National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter.

The Red Sox game was the perfect setting for these kids and their families to connect.

“It’s nice to be with people like me, who understand,” said Jamilex Rivas, 17, Worcester, Mass.  Tyler Seiders , 16, of Derry, N.H. agreed.  “[It] feels good to be around other people who have MS,” he said.

The Red Sox ended up losing to the Seattle Mariners that day, but the kids living with MS were the big winners.   Just ask Luis Reyes, 15, of Boston.

“It’s amazing to know I’m not alone.” 

If you are the parent of a teen or young child with MS, contact the National MS Society at 1-800-344-4867, or www.MSnewengland.org, to access resources and support.

Photos by Dan Young dan@tensixsix.com


Victoria Esselman, 17, Medford, MA


Jamilex Rivas, 17, Worcester, MA


Tyler Seiders, 16, Derry, NH


Jill Ryan, 16, Topsfield. MA


Peter Marggraf, 15, Exeter, NH


Timothy Hogan, 17, Windsor, NY


(L-R) Beth Convino, Victoria Convino, 17, Sarah Convino of Stamford, CT
 

About the Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The National MS Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The Society’s Greater New England Chapter serves 21,000 individuals and families affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and by contacting the National MS Society at www.MSnewengland.org, or 1 800 FIGHT MS (344 4867).

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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