"Multiple Sclerosis, the Vikings and Nordic Skiing" to air on Minnesota Public Television - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Upper Midwest Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and several counties in western Wisconsin and Nebraska, and raises funds for critical MS research. Join the Movement toward a world free of MS.

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"Multiple Sclerosis, the Vikings and Nordic Skiing" to air on Minnesota Public Television

January 17, 2014

MS researcher Dr. Ian Duncan’s film, "Multiple Sclerosis, the Vikings and Nordic Skiing," will air on Minnesota Public Television during the month of February. The film explores the benefits of living a healthy and active lifestyle, especially for people diagnosed with MS. It includes interviews with Dr. Duncan and other global researchers; MS patients from Colorado, Iowa, Norway and Minnesota; and six-time Olympic skiing medalist Vegard Ulvang.

Click here for air times. Click here to watch the film online.

 

 

About the Upper Midwest Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Upper Midwest Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and several counties in western Wisconsin and Nebraska, and raises funds for critical MS research. Join the Movement toward a world free of MS.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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