Local Expert Talks MS Research Progress (1) - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Upstate New York Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Upstate New York and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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Local Expert Talks MS Research Progress

April 1, 2014

Corning, NY – Just as the National MS Society invests $29 million in new research to support an expected 83 new MS research projects to stop multiple sclerosis, a local MS researcher will be updating the community on “MS Research: The Progress, The Promise,” at the Radisson Hotel in Corning on Thursday, April 3. The event is open to the public and hosted by the National MS Society Upstate New York Chapter.

Featured speaker Megan Hyland, MD of the University of Rochester MS Center specializes in neurology. She will be speaking about emerging MS drug therapies, local and worldwide research studies, and current treatment options for people living with MS.

Hyland is the Assistant Professor for the Department of Neurology at the University of Rochester. Her education includes a fellowship at Cleveland Clinic and residency in neurology at Strong Memorial Hospital.

The Upstate New York Chapter serves more than 12,800 people with MS and their families and caregivers. Multiple sclerosis impacts and challenges the lives of more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

The National MS Society has already invested more than $50 million in 2014 to support 380 new and ongoing studies around the world. The 83 new projects are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever for every single person with MS.

Multiple sclerosis interrupts the flow of information within the brain and between the brain and the body. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease.

“MS research is a priority, an we strive to pursue all promising research paths and collaborate worldwide to drive progress toward a cure,” says Stephanie Kunes-Mincer, President and CEO of the Nationa MS Society Upstate New York Chapter. “The Society has fueled many advances in understanding and managing MS, and we will keep moving forward until we can say goodbye to MS forever.”

The community is invited to learn about MS research and media is invited for photos/video during the event.


What:                                 "MS Research: The Progress, The Promise"
Why:                                    Update community on MS research
Where:                                Radisson Hotel, 125 Denison Pkway, Corning, NY 14830
When:                                 Thursday, April 3; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

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For more information, contact Ashley Greenman, Senior Manager of Community Engagement, 585-271-0805 (x70322), Ashley.Greenman@nmss.org.

About the Upstate New York Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Upstate New York Chapter is nationally recognized as a leader in providing comprehensive service programs for more than 12,800 people with MS and their families in 50 counties. We are dedicated to mobilizing people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The chapter has offices in Buffalo, Rochester, and Albany.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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