Plattsburgh Woman Mobilizes Community, Ensures Availability of Wheelchairs at Walk MS: Plattsburgh - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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The Upstate New York Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Upstate New York and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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Plattsburgh Woman Mobilizes Community, Ensures Availability of Wheelchairs at Walk MS: Plattsburgh

April 28, 2014

Plattsburgh, NY – Amy Wells is preparing to participate in Walk MS: Plattsburgh, and she wants the community to join her. Wells was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2006. MS is an unpredictable and often debilitating disease that affects the central nervous system, but Wells will not let her diagnosis get in the way of working toward a cure. She is team captain of “Don’t MS With Me” for the second consecutive year. Friends, family and co-workers join together to support Wells’ efforts to raise awareness and funds for MS research.

“It was a pretty challenging experience when I found out that I had MS,” said Wells, “you never know what each day is going to bring.”

Despite the challenges of having multiple sclerosis, Wells continues to be a key participant and serves an integral role with the National MS Society Upstate New York Chapter. She has worked with local community partners to provide wheelchairs for those who would like to participate in Walk MS but may have difficulties walking the route.

“With the donation of wheelchairs at the 2014 Plattsburgh Walk MS we can ensure that everyone who wants to participate has the opportunity,” said Wells. “I believe Walk MS is great for spreading awareness and bringing the community together. It amazes me how many people ask ‘what is MS?’ when it affects so many people and families.”

MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide and more than 12,800 people in the 50-county region served by the Upstate New York Chapter.

On the first Tuesday of every month, Wells facilitates support group meetings at the United Way office on Tom Miller Road in Plattsburgh. If you are interested in attending or want to learn more information, contact Amy Wells at 518-578-7497.

If you’re interested in joining Walk MS as a volunteer or as a participant, you can register on site the day of the event, or online at walkMSupstateny.org.

What:                                Walk MS 2014
Where:                             Plattsburgh, 52 U.S. Oval, Plattsburgh, NY 12903
When:                              Sunday, May 4; registration 9 a.m.; opening ceremony 9:55 a.m.
How:                                 Participants can register on site the day of the event, or online at
                                            walkMSupstateny.org.

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For more information or to arrange an interview, contact Ashley Greenman, Senior Manager of Community Engagement, 585-271-0805 (x70322), Ashley.Greenman@nmss.org.

About the Upstate New York Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Upstate New York Chapter is nationally recognized as a leader in providing comprehensive service programs for more than 12,800 people with MS and their families in 50 counties. We are dedicated to mobilizing people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The chapter has offices in Buffalo, Rochester, and Albany.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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