Bike MS: Ride the Rhode - Team Captain Doug Moore of East Greenwich goes the distance for Rhode Isla - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Bike MS: Ride the Rhode - Team Captain Doug Moore of East Greenwich goes the distance for Rhode Islanders with MS

May 28, 2014

WARWICK, R.I., - Nearly a decade ago, Doug Moore was riding his stationary bike on a cold winter’s day in Seattle, flipping through an MS Connection newsletter, when he saw an ad for Bike MS.

“I thought that seemed like fate,” said Moore, who had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis a few years earlier. “I’ve been extremely lucky the way MS impacts me, in a minimum way, and I had a very good network of friends and supporters who would be very generous in supporting me to raise funds and that was the impetus to ride.”

And ride and raise funds he has. This summer will mark his tenth year of participating in Bike MS when he cycles in Bike MS: Ride the Rhode to benefit the Rhode Island Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The event will be held June 21-22, 2014, and is the Chapter’s largest fundraiser, attracting nearly 1,000 cyclists and raising more than $800,000. Moore’s team, CU Later MS, is expected to reach a combined 10-year fundraising total of more than $300,000.

“It’s a substantial amount of money but it’s also awareness and it’s fun for me,” said Moore, who is a member of the Rhode Island Chapter’s Board of Trustees. “It’s a great way for me to stay physically and mentally focused on things related to the disease.”

From Seattle, Moore moved to New York, and eventually settled in East Greenwich in 2007 where he lives with his wife and children. Every year, the family hosts a team dinner the night before the event and ends the 150-mile weekend ride at their house. Many CU Later MS team members return annually, coming from all over the country. CU stands for Moore’s alma mater Cornell University, and many of his college friends ride with him and he’s added Rhode Island riders to his team also.

“They make it a habit,” he said of team members coming together every summer to cycle in Bike MS. “We have some serious triathletes but we all start together and drink beers together at the end but everyone has their own pacing.”

The premiere 2-day cycling event in the state, Bike MS: Ride the Rhode will kick off from Pawtucket on June 21 and cyclists will ride approximately 75 miles to Wheaton College in Norton, Mass. They will be met with enthusiastic supporters, a beer tent, and BBQ. Later, they will feast on dinner and enjoy entertainment before staying overnight. The next morning, they will cycle the remaining 75 miles along a different route to the starting location  to celebrate with a finish line lunch. The ride is considered easy-to-moderate with various riding conditions and some rolling hills. To register or learn more, visit www.bikemsrhodeisland.org.

Bike MS: Ride the Rhode sponsors include: Dupuis Oil, Delta Dental, AAA of Southern New England, FedEx, Harpoon Brewery, Dash Bicycle, East Providence Cycle, NBX, W.E. Stedman, and Your Bike Shop.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.1 million people worldwide.

 

About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society

MS stops people from moving. The National MS Society exists to make sure it doesn’t. The Society addresses the challenges of each person affected by MS by funding cutting-edge research, driving change through advocacy, facilitating professional education, collaborating with MS organizations around the world, and providing programs and services designed to help people with MS and their families move forward with their lives. The Society is dedicated to achieving a world free of MS. Join the movement at nationalMSsociety.org.

 

Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for many people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and contacting the National MS Society at nationalMSsociety.org or 1-800-FIGHT-MS (344-4867).

 

 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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