Walk MS Raises Nearly $1.3 Million in Wisconsin - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Walk MS Raises Nearly $1.3 Million in Wisconsin

July 5, 2013

More than 11,500 walkers and 550 volunteers participated in the walks this spring.

The Walk MS events held in 18 communities throughout Wisconsin in April and May have raised nearly $1.3 million with a goal of $1.5 million. The funds will be used for multiple sclerosis-related research, as well as programs and services for the more than 10,000 children, women and men diagnosed with MS in the state.

Wisconsin is believed to have one of the higher MS prevalence rates in the nation.

Held every spring in Wisconsin since 1984, the fully accessible Walk MS routes – three miles on average – have become a focal point for family members, friends, co-workers and neighbors who want to show their support for those living with the disease while raising awareness in their communities. The largest walks were held in Milwaukee, Madison and De Pere; the new site added this year was Rhinelander.

There is no registration fee for Walk MS events, so the money raised comes completely from participant donations and individual fundraising as well as corporate sponsorships. Sponsors this year included Columbia St. Mary’s and CSA in addition to a number of businesses throughout the state and in specific communities that generously provided support.

Donations are still being accepted online at www.walkMSwisconsin.org and by phone at (262) 369-4400 (toll-free 800-242-3358). 

About the Wisconsin Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Wisconsin Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society proudly serves more than 10,000 residents diagnosed with MS, and those who love and care for them.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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