Congressional MS Caucus FAQ's - National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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Congressional MS Caucus FAQ's

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What is a congressional caucus?

A congressional caucus is a group of members of Congress who share common interests, goals and/or legislative objectives. Many members of Congress join a caucus to bring attention to a specific issue, particularly if they have a personal interest or connection to the issue, or it affects many members in their state or district
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What is the Congressional MS Caucus?

The Congressional MS Caucus is a bipartisan caucus comprised of dedicated members of the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate who raise awareness about MS on Capitol Hill.  The National MS Society Public Policy Office and MS activists work with MS Caucus members to seek and advance creative federal policy solutions to the challenges facing people living with MS, family members and other caregivers, and providers. Issues include MS research funding, access to quality care, employment and insurance issues, and disability rights.

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What do members of the MS Caucus do?

  • Speak at or attend informative briefings on MS
  • Receive regular e-mail updates on issues of importance to those with MS
  • Raise awareness and promote education about MS in our efforts to move closer to a world free of MS
  • Participate in local MS events
  • Network with others who would like to move closer to a world free of MS
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How can I get my member of Congress to join the MS Caucus?

During an office visit or through a communication with the office, simply ask the member to join, discuss the benefits of joining and what joining would mean to you as a constituent and provide this handout (.pdf). Be sure to follow up with the office and thank the member once s/he has joined the MS Caucus.

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