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Possible MS

Find information, resources and tips for managing that challenging time before a diagnosis of MS can either be confirmed or ruled out.

Cherish
Diagnosed in 2002

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Overview

If you have come to this page, you’re probably worrying that you or someone you care about may have MS. Perhaps you’ve read descriptions of MS on the Internet that sounded like symptoms you are experiencing. Maybe someone else in your family has MS and you’re worried about your own chances of developing it. Or, perhaps you’ve been told by your doctor that you might have MS because you have experienced a single episode of MS-like symptoms.

Whatever your situation is, we’re glad that you have come to the National MS Society for assistance. We are here to help you — with information about MS, tips for deciding when and how to tell people about your medical issues, and whatever else you may need during this difficult time.  For referrals to physicians in your area, call 1-800-344-4867 to speak to one of our information specialists. Here is some information to get you started:
What it means to have possible MS
Featured Video

Possible MS

Rock Heyman, MD, defines the term clinically isolated syndrome, and describes what it means to have possible MS.

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Is there someone I can talk to about my situation?

Absolutely. If you have questions about MS — what it is, how it’s diagnosed, how it’s treated, what might happen or any other issues that are of concern to you, call 1-800-344-4867 to speak to one of our information specialists.

Why can’t the doctor tell me what’s wrong with me?

MS isn’t an easy disease to diagnose. In the first place, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis. Second, the diagnosis cannot be made until the doctor finds evidence of two episodes of disease activity in the central nervous system that have occurred at different points in time — which means that confirming the diagnosis is sometimes a waiting game. And third, most MS symptoms can also be caused by other conditions, which means that the doctor needs to rule out all other possible explanations. Very often, when a central nervous system problem, such as MS is suspected, many tests will need to be done before the diagnosis is confirmed.

Are there any treatments available to help me in the meantime?

  • If your doctor believes — based on your medical history, physical exam, and test results — that you are at high risk of developing MS, there are medications that have been shown to delay the development of clinically-definite MS.
  • If you’re experiencing symptoms that are making you uncomfortable or interfering with your everyday activities, be sure to discuss them with your doctor. Many symptoms can be successfully managed even without a confirmed diagnosis.
  • If you’re feeling overwhelmed or stressed out by your symptoms or the uncertainty of the diagnosis, consider talking with a counselor about it. The Society can refer you to a professional in your area for help in dealing with this difficult situation.

What should I say to my employer about my medical problems and absences from work?

It’s important to keep in mind that the information you share now may affect your employment situation in the future. Before sharing any details with your employer or colleagues, contact the National MS Society for information about your rights in the workplace or check out the employment information on our website.

 

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A diagnosis of probable MS
Featured Video

A Diagnosis of Probable MS

Mary Hughes, MD, discusses a diagnosis of probable MS. 

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