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12 National Patient Advocacy Organizations Urge Senate to Vote “No” on Advancing ACA Repeal, Urging Bipartisan Approach

July 24, 2017

12 nonpartisan, patient and provider groups representing millions of Americans issued the following statement today ahead of the Senate procedural vote to advance repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA): 

A vote to proceed with this legislation is a vote to end health coverage for tens of millions of Americans. According to the Congressional Budget Office, repealing the ACA without a replacement would result in 32 million Americans losing health coverage. Additionally, repealing the ACA and replacing it with one of the alternatives proposed by the House or Senate would result in between 22 and 23 million Americans losing vital health coverage. 

This current path is unacceptable for the millions of Americans we represent. We urge the Senate to vote ‘no’ on this motion, and instead work towards a bipartisan approach that strengthens our health care system and ensures access to affordable and adequate health coverage for all Americans
.” 

The 12 national patient-advocacy organizations are: 

ALS Association 
American Diabetes Association
American Heart Association
American Lung Association 
Arthritis Foundation 
Cancer Action Network 
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
March of Dimes
Muscular Dystrophy Association
National Health Council
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
National Organization for Rare Disorders

Learn more about access to affordable, quality health insurance coverage. 

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