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Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf Honored for Commitment to Changing the World for People with Multiple Sclerosis

March 20, 2017

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has named Governor Tom Wolf as its 2016 Governor of the Year.
Gov. Wolf has been a champion of access to healthcare for people in his state. He expanded the Pennsylvania’s Medicaid program, which extended healthcare benefits to nearly 700,000 residents. This reduced the state’s uninsured population from 14 percent to 6.4 percent, which is well below the national average and 15th lowest in the U.S.
 
“Governor Wolf works tirelessly to ensure that the people of Pennsylvania can live their best lives,” National MS Society President and CEO Cyndi Zagieboylo said. “His work to expand access to healthcare coverage is vital and the National MS Society is proud to recognize him as Governor of the Year.”
 
As an advocate for people with disabilities, Gov. Wolf supports increased access to home and community-based services that allow people to remain independent and active participants of society. He signed into law the Pennsylvania Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (PA ABLE) that enables the creation of tax-exempt savings accounts specifically for people with qualified disabilities and their families. These accounts can be used for a wide range of disability-related expenses including health care, housing and transportation without jeopardizing eligibility for important programs on which individuals with disabilities must often depend.
 
Wolf thanked the MS Society for the honor, “Here in Pennsylvania, I’ll do everything I can to make sure we are protecting people’s coverage and improving their health outcomes - including those living with and affected by MS.”

The National MS Society presented the Governor of the Year award to a representative of Wolf during its 26th annual Public Policy Conference, held March 20-22 in Washington, D.C. The event united nearly 300 MS activists from across the country to educate elected officials about the needs of people affected by MS.
 
For more information on the Society and MS issues, visit nationalMSsociety.org/advocacy, facebook.com/nationalMSsociety, twitter.com/MSactivist, or follow #MS, #MSactivist, #MSresearch #NIH #CDMRP, and #neurodata on social media.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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