Skip to navigation Skip to content

News

Share

21st Century Cures Act Passes U.S. House of Representatives

December 1, 2016

November 30, 2016 – The National Multiple Sclerosis Society applauds the passage of the 21st Century Cures Act in the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill passed with a 392-26 vote showing overwhelming support for medical innovations in Congress.

The Society is pleased that the bill includes many components that will accelerate the discovery, development and delivery of life-saving treatments and improve the day-to day lives of people with MS. Of top priority to the Society and MS activists, 21st Century Cures includes:
  • Establishment of a data collection system to track the incidence and prevalence of neurological conditions, otherwise known as the “Neuro Data” bill;
  • $4.8 billion in new funding for the National Institutes of Health and $500 million for the Food and Drug Administration to bring new treatments to patients;
  • A 6-month extension protecting access to power complex rehabilitation technology (CRT) wheelchair accessories—which are fundamental components of the chair such as tilt-and-recline systems and specialized seat cushions.
The bill also includes enhanced coordination and collaboration on rehabilitation research, accelerated approval for regenerative advanced therapies and increased national focus and resources on mental health – specifically mental health parity.

“With today’s overwhelming bipartisan vote, we took a giant leap forward on the #Path2Cures,” said Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) and Rep. Diana DeGette (D-CO), co-authors of the bill. “21st Century Cures is the innovation game-changer that patients, their loved ones, and the nation’s researchers and scientists so desperately need. The White House has expressed its enthusiastic endorsement of this critical legislation. So it’s now on to the Senate, where we are just one final vote away from delivering #CuresNow.”

The Senate has received the bill and could vote as early as next Monday, December 5. Click here to see how your U.S. Representative voted.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Share