Skip to navigation Skip to content

News

Share

MS Activists Head to Harrisburg for Pennsylvania State Action Day

September 30, 2019

PA.jpg
Pennsylvania MS Activists can be seen here with Representative Matzie (Pennsylvania’s 16th House District) as they get ready to kick-off State Action Day at the Pennsylvania Capitol. Activists met with legislators throughout the day to urge their support for prior authorization and step therapy reform legislation and to create a paid leave system by passing the Family Care Act.  Activists met with 35 legislators and dropped off folders at dozens of other offices. They were successful in gaining many cosponsors on the important issues and educating legislators on MS. 

First time attendee and District Activist Leader Diane Kramer shared: “Partnering with the NMSS and combining forces with other State Activists during State Action Day gave back to me what multiple sclerosis has been trying to take from me since my diagnosis in 2010- a voice. Sharing my story with elected officials, and hearing their stories in return made a impact on me, and helped me feel like we are all on the same team, fighting in every arena we can, to create a world without multiple sclerosis. 

Our 2019 policy priorities are essential in supporting us in our every day lives with MS while we wait and work for a cure. Being part of the State Action Day team and sharing my story of the impact of MS on my life helps to illustrate to those less familiar with this disease that we are in desperate need of prior authorization reform and the establishment of the Family Care Act in Pennsylvania.

I didn't need to know exactly how to navigate the Capital building, or the intimate details of legislation to be a part of State Action Day. I was qualified to be there, and to speak with my elected officials, because the 2019 policy priorities have a real impact on my life, and the lives of others living with MS. I was equipped with all of the information and resources I needed to make my voice heard. I am looking forward to watching the impact our visits had in future legislation.


Hear more about Diane’s experience on her YouTube page.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Share