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MS Activists Inducted into the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Volunteer Hall of Fame

November 27, 2018

Two MS activists were recently inducted into the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Volunteer Hall of Fame during its annual Leadership Conference [held this year in Atlanta, GA] for their outstanding commitment to creating a world free of MS.  Volunteers are recognized for their contributions in the areas of advocacy, funding the mission, programs and services, health professional care, and scientific research. 

Congratulations to our 2018 Advocacy Volunteer Hall of Fame inductees: 

Janet Mohrmann
Over the course of her 12 years volunteering with the Society, Janet Mohrmann has gone from volunteering in the Society office and at Mike MS® and Walk MS® events to working with state and federal lawmakers. She initially knew very little about complicated policies, but Janet stepped outside her comfort zone and became a leading advocate in Ohio for legislation involving Medicaid and Medicaid expansion, step therapy, healthcare access and home modification tax credits.

She advocated for federal policy issues such as the Affordable Care Act, affordable prescription drugs and MS research funding. She worked tirelessly to contact and educate Ohio state representatives and senators to resolve issues surrounding bundling services for nursing homes in the state budget. She made sure legislators knew the stories of the people affected by these policies. Janet learned social media platforms to build an online presence. She has recruited a number of activists to attend State Action Days and join the MS Activist Network, leading to their own empowerment as advocates. As someone living with MS, Janet does everything she can to give voice to others affected by MS.

Robert Picone
Robert Picone’s talent for cultivating new connections and building relationships with federal, state and local government officials in Maine has resulted in progress on a number of important issues. He has advocated for MS research initiatives as a District Activist Leader and has chaired the Government Relations Advisory Committee. 

Bob is a familiar face at the Maine statehouse, often visiting twice a month. On the healthcare front, he worked with state lawmakers to pass legislation to reduce out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs and has participated in work sessions to write language for prescription drug transparency and step therapy legislation. He’s taken a lead role in advancing a home modification tax credit law. Bob’s local legislators sponsored State Action Day as a result of his efforts. His success is due in no small part to his efforts at seeking diverse perspectives and bipartisan support. 

Bob uses his platform as host of the weekly Biddeford Access television program “Issues that Matter” to feature Society staff members and MS priority policy issues. And on a personal level, he is always willing to share his own story about his MS diagnosis and its effects on both him and his wife. Bob also has worked with the Society and other organizations, including AARP, to advance a family caregiver resolution. Bob has been a steadfast champion of issues that aim to help improve the lives of people living with MS.

Learn more about becoming a volunteer with the National MS Society at http://www.nationalmssociety.org/Get-Involved/Volunteer

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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