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MS Trial Alert: People with MS Being Recruited for Study of Teleconference Intervention to Increase Exercise and Decrease Fatigue

February 10, 2016

Summary: Investigators at Case Western Reserve University are recruiting 215 people from 10 states (see list below) for a study to determine whether methods of fatigue management and increasing physical activity that are often provided by rehabilitation centers can be distributed with a series of teleconferences and phone interviews. Matthew Plow, PhD, the primary investigator, is funded by a research grant from the National MS Society.

Rationale: Many people with MS describe fatigue as one of their most disabling symptoms. MS fatigue can be chronic, severe, and it often interferes with the ability to maintain employment or engage in leisure activities. The reduced physical activity that results from MS fatigue can lower physical conditioning. This can lead to higher than normal levels of fatigue from normal activities of daily living, setting up a "vicious cycle" in which fatigue and physical inactivity enhance each other.

In this research project, Matthew Plow, PhD, is conducting a randomized controlled trial to see whether methods of fatigue management and increasing physical activity that are often provided by physical therapists and/or occupational therapist at medical rehabilitation centers can be distributed with a series of teleconferences and phone interviews.

Eligibility and Details: Participants should be ages 18 to 65, with a diagnosis of MS and the ability to walk 25 feet with or without a cane. Among those excluded are people who exercise more than 90 minutes per week, are pregnant, have metabolic or cardiopulmonary disease that puts them at high risk for engaging in a home exercise program, or have had four or more falls in the past 6 months. Further details on inclusion and exclusion criteria are available from the contact below.

Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups receiving support through weekly phone conferences: an educational program that combines fatigue management with physical activity promotion; a physical activity promotion program alone; or an educational social support group.

The primary outcomes being measured are changes in physical activity levels over 24 weeks, and secondary outcomes include fatigue levels and quality of life.

Contact: To learn more about the enrollment criteria for this study, and to find out if you are eligible to participate, please contact Meghan Golding, 216-368-0643, Meghan.Golding@UHhospitals.org. The Case Western Reserve University is enrolling participants from the following states:

Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Michigan
New Jersey
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
West Virginia
Wisconsin

Download a brochure that discusses issues to think about when considering enrolling in an MS clinical trial (PDF).

Without participants in research studies, MS research would come to a standstill. Read more here.
 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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