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Multiple Sclerosis Coalition Consensus Paper on Disease-Modifying Therapies is Available

September 7, 2016

A paper entitled "The Use of Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis: Principles and Current Evidence. A Consensus Paper by the Multiple Sclerosis Coalition" is available; this paper was originally posted in 2014 and updated in 2016.

The evidence-based paper, developed and endorsed by the eight-member MS Coalition, and subsequently endorsed by Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS), will serve as an education and advocacy tool for people with MS and their healthcare providers. The purpose of the paper is to promote the importance of early and ongoing treatment and full access to all of the disease-modify therapies.

Details:
A paper entitled The Use of Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis: Principles and Current Evidence. A Consensus Paper by the Multiple Sclerosis Coalition is now available. This landmark document, developed and endorsed by the eight-member MS Coalition, and subsequently endorsed by Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS), was written by a collaborative writing team that included Society staff. The paper was reviewed by nine MS specialists selected by the Coalition, as well as an additional 42 experts representing the individual organizations. The evidence-based paper emphasizes the importance of early and ongoing treatment and full access to all of the disease-modify therapies.

A companion summary paper for general audiences is also available.

The paper can be accessed online and will soon be available in print as well. Coalition members worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive dissemination plan to ensure the broadest possible reach for this paper.
 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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