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National MS Society Commits $14.2 Million to New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever

April 12, 2018

-- Projects include: investigating myelin repair strategies, the role of gut bacteria, and non-pharmaceutical approaches to managing debilitating pain in people with MS

The National MS Society has just committed more than $14.2 million to support 45 new MS research projects. These are part of a comprehensive approach to accelerate research breakthroughs aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever. 
 
This financial commitment is the latest in the Society’s relentless research effort, investing a projected $34 million in 2018 alone for new and ongoing studies around the globe. The Society stimulates studies worldwide, leverages opportunities, fosters collaboration, and shapes the research landscape to address the urgent needs of people with MS.
 
Just a few of the of the new cutting-edge research projects include two projects at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital exploring the role of gut bacteria in MS; studies focusing ways to repair nerve-insulating myelin including one at University of California, San Francisco investigating the potential of repurposed medications to promote repair; and a team at the University of Washington testing non-pharmaceutical approaches to managing debilitating pain in MS.
 
“These new research projects and training awards strengthen the Society’s comprehensive approach addressing critical research and scientific workforce priorities. Focusing our investments on the most important unanswered questions will lead to breakthroughs for people with MS,” noted Bruce Bebo, PhD, National MS Society’s Executive Vice President, Research. 

“These research dollars are raised by hundreds of thousands of dedicated people across the country who walk, run, bike, and even trek through mud at our events. We honor their efforts, as well as the efforts of all who write checks to support our mission,” said Cyndi Zagieboylo, the Society’s President and CEO. “We could not fund this important research without them.” (Get involved!)

To find the best research with the most promise, the Society relies on more than 130 world-class scientists who volunteer their time to carefully evaluate hundreds of proposals every year.  This rigorous evaluation process assures that the Society invests in research that delivers results in the shortest time possible. 

Read more
Read descriptions of the new research projects
Check out a list of current research projects funded by the Society, organized by topic or location
 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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