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National MS Society Joins “Partners for Better Care” Nonpartisan Coalition

December 3, 2015

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) – Patient advocacy groups announced today the launch of Partners for Better Care (PBC), a nonpartisan coalition beginning with over 10 million patients who seek to advance a common goal: better health care for all Americans.

The National MS Society joins AIDS United, American Liver Foundation, Amputee Coalition, the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, Hemophilia Federation of America, The MAGIC Foundation, Parkinson’s Action Network and United Cerebral Palsy as inaugural members of the coalition.

“High quality medical care is available in the United States, but many Americans are unable to access the care they need,” said Mary Richards, Executive Director of Partners for Better Care. “Access to affordable, patient-centered care is critical.”

Bari Talente, Executive Vice President of Advocacy at National MS Society added:
“The National MS Society is pleased to be a founding member of Partners for Better Care as their goals align with the Society’s own Access to High Quality MS Healthcare Principles. We are proud to partner with other organizations to improve quality healthcare for all Americans, especially those living with a chronic disease. By working together, we can bring meaningful change so people get affordable access to the healthcare they need.”

Click here to read the Partners for Better Care inaugural press release.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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