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New Study Shows No Link Between Mineral Intake and MS Risk…Eating Healthy Still Important to Managing MS

April 4, 2019

Harvard epidemiologists found no link between mineral intake (specifically, zinc, iron, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, manganese and copper) and the development of MS. The team assessed mineral intake using a questionnaire administered to more than 175,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Studies I & II, which followed participants for up to 20 years. During the study, 479 of the women developed MS. The researchers looked at whether levels of dietary or supplementary mineral consumption were tied to higher or lower levels of MS risk by comparing those who developed MS and those who did not. The study was supported by the National MS Society and the National Institutes of Health.

While this study does not support the idea that mineral intake influences a person’s chance of getting MS, it also does not imply that diet has no bearing on a person’s experience living with MS. Maintenance of general good health is very important for people with any chronic disorder: what and how you eat can make a difference in your energy level, bladder and bowel function, and overall health. Learn more about how eating healthy can help you to take charge.

Read a press release from the American Academy of Neurology

Read the study abstract in Neurology
 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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