Skip to navigation Skip to content

News

Share

Spending Bill Eases Restrictions on Medical Marijuana

December 30, 2014

The Federal Government has announced that they would end their prohibition on the use of marijuana for medical purposes during fiscal year 2015 in those states where the use of marijuana was approved for medical purposes by May 2014. The bill prevents the Justice Department from charging individuals or dispensaries that are complying with state medical marijuana practices and does not apply to street dealers or recreational users.
 
The Society supports the rights of people with MS to work with their health care provider to access marijuana for medical purposes in accordance with legal regulations in those states where such use has been approved. In addition, the Society supports the need for more research to better understand the benefits and potential risks of marijuana and its derivatives as a treatment for MS. We believe that the federal government’s decision to end their prohibition on the use of marijuana for medical purposes in fiscal year 2015 will ease the existing legal confusion in those states listed in the legislation, where the use of marijuana was approved for medical purposes by May 2014.
 
 
 

 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Share