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Emotional Health

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    Services

    1. Ask an MS Navigator

      The Society's MS Navigators help identify solutions and provide access to the resources you are looking for. Call 1-800-344-4867 or see "More info" to contact us online.

    2. Join a Group or Discussion

      Looking to connect with other caregivers, family members, or people affected by MS? Self-help groups bring people together who share common life experiences for support, education and mutual aid.

    3. Connect with Peers One-on-One

      Search for and connect with a trained peer support volunteer who can provide you with helpful tips, suggestions and emotional support for the challenges that MS throws at you. Connect via one-on-one ongoing telephone or email conversations.

    4. MSFriends® Helpline

      Support from a trained volunteer living with MS, when you want and need it. Connect today by calling the MSFriends helpline at 1-866-673-7436

    Resources

    1. Depression and MS (.pdf)

      Symptoms of depression, the relationship between MS and depression, available therapies, and where to find help. (last updated January 2019)

    2. Plaintalk—A Booklet about MS for Families (.pdf)

      Discusses some of the more difficult physical and emotional problems many families face. By Sarah Minden, MD, and Debra Frankel, MS, OTR. (last updated August 2015)

    3. Multiple Sclerosis and Your Emotions (.pdf)

      How to manage some of the emotional challenges created by MS. By Rosalind Kalb, PhD (last updated February 2019)

    4. Mood Changes and MS, Part 3: Diagnosing and Treating Depression (video)

      This video features a discussion on diagnosing and treating depression in people with multiple sclerosis.

    5. Guidelines for the Outside Meeting Support Program (.pdf)

      This document provides guidelines for the National MS Society's support of meetings, workshops and conferences.

    6. MS & Stress (Teleconference Recording)

      Recorded Aug 7, 2014. This teleconference will help you learn how to recognize the signs of stress, new strategies to help reduce stress, distinguish between stress and depression, and understand how high levels of stress may impact MS.

    7. Curing MS: How Science Is Solving Mysteries of Multiple Sclerosis (book)

      Dr. Weiner is at the cutting edge of MS research and drug development, and he describes in clear and illuminating detail the science behind the symptoms and how new drugs may hold the key to “taming the monster.” In Curing MS, Dr. Weiner teaches us the “Twenty-one Points” of MS, a concise breakdown of the knowns and unknowns of the disease; tells stories from the frontlines of laboratories and hospitals; and offers a message of hope that a cure can—and will—be found.

    8. A History of MS (book)

      This work aims to answer some of the fundamental questions of the history of MS.

    9. Enabling Romance (book)

      Considered by many to be "The Joy of Sex for people with disabilities," Enabling Romance candidly covers: shattering sexual stereotypes; building self-esteem; creative sexual variations; reproduction and contraception for people with disabilities; specific information on several different physical and sensory disabilities, including spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, postpolio syndrome, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, amputation, blindness and deafness.

    10. Managing the Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (book)

      In clear, understandable language and with helpful illustrations, this book explores every symptom of MS and discusses clinically tested and proven methods for the proper and effective management of each. No symptom is omitted: from spasticity, tremor, weakness, and fatigue to bladder, bowel, and sexual difficulties.

    11. Depression In MS

    12. Cambios Anímicos en Personas con Esclerosis Múltiple

      Si bien los profesionales clínicos notaron los cambios anímicos asociados a la esclerosis múltiple desde el siglo XIX no les dieron el mismo nivel de atención a los síntomas anímicos que a los síntomas físicos, sino hasta hace poco.

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