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The Greater New England Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.”

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Kids, Cars, and a Whole Lot of Money for MS!

May 8, 2014

Boston College students and Ford Motor Company representatives present check to National MS Society. (left to right) Anthony Marte, Matthew Nacier, Neal Cammarano, Liz Strawn, Chris Khan, Philip Podgorny, and Lisa Chiriboga.

To say Boston College students are some of the best in the nation would be correct, but when it comes to fundraising for the National MS Society, they are THE best in the nation!

A team of four BC students teamed up with Muzi Ford (muziford.com) in Needham, MA to take on the Ford College Ambassador Challenge. They competed locally against teams from Boston University and Northeastern University. Each team had to complete three challenges associated with business, marketing, and philanthropy.

 “I like marketing, I like cars; I thought it would be fun,” said team leader Chris Khan, a graduate student from Brooklyn, NY.

He also loves his mother – which is why when the team had to decide on a charity to benefit from the philanthropy challenge, Chris chose the National MS Society.

“My mom has MS.”

The philanthropy challenge involved getting as many people as possible to test drive a Ford vehicle on campus on March 21, 2014. For each person who took a test drive, Ford would donate $20.00 to MS. The team organized the event and promoted it to other students and alums through social media. 

 “I think we were always very confident in ourselves,” said team member Anthony Marte, a BC senior from South Bronx, NY.

Team member Lisa Chiriboga, a junior from Chicago said they didn’t tell people about Chris’s mom, but she had an effect on their fundraising.  “Definitely more of a personal motivation,” said Chiriboga.

The team raised a whopping $4,040 for MS, not only beating the two other local teams, but also every other team in the country!

“These kids are truly the brightest and best out there,” said Ford Motor Company regional manager Philip Podgorny. “I’m really proud of them.”

At a check presentation at Muzi Ford on May 6, 2014, Liz Strawn of the National MS Society (MSnewengland.org) thanked the students for their efforts on behalf of the 19,000 people in the area who will benefit from the donation. “This is proving them hope,” said Strawn.

Team member Matthew Nacier, a senior from Highland Village, TX said they learned a lot about business from the Ford College Ambassador Challenge, but that wasn’t the only lesson. It taught them, “not just about Ford, but how to be better young people,” he said.

Neal Cammarano, owner of  Muzi Ford said he and his team were grateful to take part in the program.

“Some things are just great things to get involved with. We didn’t do it for marketing; it’s just a great thing to do.”

About the Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The National MS Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The Society’s Greater New England Chapter serves 21,000 individuals and families affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and by contacting the National MS Society at www.MSnewengland.org, or 1 800 FIGHT MS (344 4867).

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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