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The Greater New England Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.”

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Five Rhode Islanders appointed to National MS Society’s Greater New England Chapter Board

December 8, 2014

WARWICK, R.I., Dec. 8, 2014 – The Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society is pleased to welcome six new board members who had previously served on the Society’s Rhode Island Chapter Board. The chapters joined together in October to serve more than 21,000 people living with multiple sclerosis in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.   

Recently appointed to three-year terms at the Greater New England Chapter’s annual meeting, the board members include:

Providence, R.I. resident Dr. Jonathan Cahill is a neurologist and MS specialist at Rhode Island Hospital’s MS Center, which participates in national clinical trials. Dr. Cahill volunteers at Walk MS in Providence and he participates in the Society’s community outreach programs.

East Providence, R.I. resident Peter G. Lamberton, who was secretary of the board of trustees for the Rhode Island Chapter, is a compensation and HRIS analyst for Cox Communications. He has served on national committees for the Society and has completed the MS Challenge Walk and the MS Climb to the Top. He is a frequent volunteer at a wide range of National MS Society events throughout the year.

Warwick, R.I. resident Mark McKiernan, CPA, is an audit supervisor at BlumShapiro. McKiernan participates every year in the MS Jet Pull at T.F. Green Airport and he volunteers at Walk MS in Narragansett.

Wakefield, R.I. resident Theresa Molloy, CPA, who was chair of the board of trustees for the Rhode Island Chapter, will serve as a vice chair and a member of the Greater New England Chapter’s Executive Committee. She is vice president and controller at FM Global. She volunteers at numerous Society events throughout the year including Walk MS in Narragansett.

Dorchester, Mass. resident John D. Mulattieri, a past chair of the board of trustees for the Rhode Island Chapter, cycles every year in the popular 150-mile bike ride, Bike MS: Ride the Rhode. He is an active leadership volunteer for the Society at the national level and he has completed the MS Climb to the Top.

East Greenwich, R.I. resident Jeanine M. Palumbo has been awarded the Outstanding Volunteer Service Award from the Society for her dedication to volunteering at events throughout the year including Bike MS: Ride the Rhode, the MS Jet Pull, the MS Holiday Bazaar, and the MS Holiday Party.

Photos of all board members are available upon request.

Contact: Ericka Tavares at ericka.tavares@nmss.org or 401.738.8436

About the Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The National MS Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. The Society’s Greater New England Chapter serves 21,000 individuals and families affected by MS in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and by contacting the National MS Society at www.MSnewengland.org, or 1 800 FIGHT MS (344 4867).

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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