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The Oregon Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS in Oregon and Southwestern Washington and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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Take Control of MS

September 2, 2014

Do you or someone you care about have Multiple Sclerosis (MS)?
 
Some MS symptoms are:

-Difficulty walking 
-Loss of balance or muscle coordination
-Numbness / Tingling
-Stiffness
-Fatigue

Researchers at Portland VA Medical Center invite you to participate in a research study that compares two different group education programs for people with MS. The purpose is to see which program is better at helping improve quality of life and MS symptoms. Both programs are from the National MS Society.
 
If you qualify, participation includes 11 study visits over a 17 month period:

-1 baseline visit
-6 two-hour group class sessions
-4 data collection visits

You will be compensated for your time and travel. If you are traveling within a 30-mile radius, you will be compensated up to $330. If you are traveling outside a 30-mile radius, you will be compensated up to $605.

For more information, please contact Kristina Wick at (503) 220-8262 ext. 51717.
 
Principal Investigator: Dennis Bourdette, MD at Portland VA Medical Center, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239
 
VA Central IRB Study #12-06: Recruitment verified by VA Central IRB 8/20/14
 

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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