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National Disability Institute Presents Fourth Annual Financial Wellness Webinar Series for People Living with Multiple Sclerosis

September 10, 2014

Program provides free information and expert insight to address unique financial challenges faced by people living with MS.

On September 17, 2014, National Disability Institute will launch the fourth annual Financial Wellness Webinar Series designed to help people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) plan for their financial futures. Expert guests with backgrounds in law, finance and public benefits will share their insight on topics including taxes, employment, social security and credit. All resources and information presented in the series will be tailored to address the unique challenges faced by people living with MS who require careful planning and preparation in order to maintain financial stability.

National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national non-profit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities.

The first webinar in the series will be held Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET and will last 90 minutes. Hosted by nationally renowned financial literacy advisor Marlene Ware, participants will learn basic steps that may lead to improved financial independence and security.

Visit www.realeconomicimpact.org/FinancialWellness for more information and to register for any of the four webinars in the series.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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