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The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS throughout Virginia and West Virginia, as well as three counties in northeastern North Carolina and seven counties in southeastern Kentucky, and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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Carepartner Teleconference Series Recordings Now Available

September 12, 2014

August 5th, 2014 at 7 pm: Strengthening Family Resilience**

This Teleconference was rescheduled. Please register for the reshceduled call on November 12, 2014.

MS happens to families, not just to individuals.  Listen to this call and learn about coping strategies to help individuals and families handle the challenges associated with daily care giving.

 

August 19th, 2014 at 7 pm:  How to Make Your Life Easier

Just as there are a wide range of abilities and disabilities among people with MS, there are a wide range of caregiving activities. Join us for this call as we discuss the array of mobility aids, tools, technology, adaptive strategies, and environmental modifications available to help carepartners conserve energy, simplify work, and ensure safety for everyone.

Guest Speaker:  Marnie Renda, OTR/L, CAPS, Independent Living Specialist

 

About the Virginia - West Virginia Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter of the National MS Society provides comprehensive programs and advocacy to assist and empower the more than 12,000 individuals with multiple sclerosis residing throughout Virginia and West Virginia, as well as three counties in northeastern North Carolina and seven counties in southeastern Kentucky. The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter is also a driving force of research for the prevention, treatment and cure of MS and contributes funds to support National MS Society research projects worldwide. The Chapter has offices in Richmond, VA; Virginia Beach, VA; Charlottesville, VA; and Charleston, WV.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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