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The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter works to improve the quality of life for people affected by MS throughout Virginia and West Virginia, as well as three counties in northeastern North Carolina and seven counties in southeastern Kentucky, and raise funds for critical MS research. Join the movement toward a world free of MS.

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Old Dominion University, Department of Human Movement Sciences, is conducting a clinical research study to learn more about falls in persons with MS.

June 18, 2014

You may be eligible if you are - Male or female, 50-79 years of age, have a physician confirmed diagnosis of MS, are able to walk 25 feet with or without aid, and able to perform light physical activity. The study involves two visits to the ODU Brain Research and Rehabilitation Lab lasting ~2 to 2 ½ hours each.  Study related procedures include questionnaires, tests of coordination, balance, walking function, and blood vessel health (no blood draws in the study). $150 will be paid upon study completion.

For more information please call Corey Rynders, PhD at 757-683-4783 or email crynders@odu.edu.  Trial title: Assessing and Preventing Falls in Multiple Sclerosis: An Integrative Approach (ODU IRB# 14-008; Rynders CA, Principal Investigator).

About the Virginia - West Virginia Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter of the National MS Society provides comprehensive programs and advocacy to assist and empower the more than 12,000 individuals with multiple sclerosis residing throughout Virginia and West Virginia, as well as three counties in northeastern North Carolina and seven counties in southeastern Kentucky. The Virginia - West Virginia Chapter is also a driving force of research for the prevention, treatment and cure of MS and contributes funds to support National MS Society research projects worldwide. The Chapter has offices in Richmond, VA; Virginia Beach, VA; Charlottesville, VA; and Charleston, WV.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are leading to better understanding and moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

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