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Research Studies: Newly Diagnosed with MS

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Introduction

Without the help of people with MS, it would be impossible to develop new and better treatment interventions, or to unravel the mysteries of this disease. Some researchers are specifically trying to understand what happens in the earliest stages of MS for clues to stopping or preventing it. Here are several studies seeking participants who are new to MS.

Be informed!
Watch  Ask an MS Expert: MS Clinical Trials – What You Need to Know
Download Participating in Clinical Trials: A Guide for People with MS

Virtual Study: Detecting early signs of cognitive problems

Researchers at NYU Langone Health, Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center, are partnering with individuals like you to discover ways to detect early signs of cognitive problems.

• We are recruiting individuals with an early diagnosis of, or at-risk, of developing MS
• The research study consists of 3 remote (at-home) visits through Zoom.
• Participants will complete a series of cognitive assessments, questionnaires, and an optional gait  (walking) assessment using small motion sensors which involves walking back and forth down a hallway of your home for 2 minutes.
• All study procedures are completed by you at home.
• Compensation will be provided for your time.

Participation in our research study is completely voluntary, free, and confidential.

For more information regarding enrollment, please contact us at 929-455-5317 or email us at Charvetlab@nyulangone.org

Detecting Early Signs of Cognitive Problems (New York)

Researchers at NYU Langone Health, Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center, are partnering with individuals like you to discover ways to detect early signs of cognitive problems.
• We are recruiting individuals with an early diagnosis of, or at-risk, of developing MS.
• The research study consists of a single visit at the NYU Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center.
• Participants will complete an MRI scan and a series of cognitive assessments, questionnaires, and an optional gait (walking) assessment.
• All study procedures are completed during a one-time visit.
• Compensation can be up to $125 for your time.

Participation in our research study is completely voluntary, free, and confidential.

For more information regarding enrollment, please contact us at 929-455-5090 or email us at NYUMSresearch@nyulangone.org
 

Interview Study: Race and Ethnicity on the Perceptions and Experiences of Exercise Therapy in People with Early MS

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are conducing an interview study to learn more about how people with an early diagnosis of MS of different backgrounds perceive the role of exercise therapy and rehabilitation in their lives since their diagnosis. The researchers’ goal is to better understand the factors that contribute to a person seeking and undergoing exercise therapy and rehabilitation, and how these interventions can be improved. The information gathered can provide recommendations and guidelines on how to better personalize exercise therapy and rehabilitation programs for an individual diagnosed with MS.

They are seeking participants who would be able to participate in a 60-90-minute interview online, by telephone, or in-person based on your preference. You may qualify if:

  • You are 18 years of age or older

  • You have been diagnosed with MS or clinically isolated syndrome

  • You are in your early years of diagnosis (5 years or less)

Participation is voluntary and all information is confidential. Participants will be compensated for their time and effort.
 
For more information or if interested, please call/text Gregory Brusola at 940-268-3482 or email at gabrusol@utmb.edu

Trial of Treatment Strategies to Prevent Disability - TREAT MS

A study based at Johns Hopkins University is comparing two treatment strategies in 900 people newly diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS, or with onset/diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS in the past who have received minimal or no treatment. The study is recruiting at approximately 45 centers nationwide. One option is an escalation approach, in which people start taking a less powerful therapy with the option of switching to a more potent therapy if disease activity continues. The other approach involves starting with a stronger therapy that is potentially more effective, but also carries the potential for greater risk for significant adverse effects. The “TRaditional versus Early Aggressive Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis” (TREAT-MS) Trial is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Read more and participate

Trial of Treatment Strategies to Prevent Disability - DELIVER MS

A study based at the Cleveland Clinic and the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom) is comparing two treatment strategies in 800 people with relapsing-remitting MS diagnosed within the past five years who have never taken a disease-modifying therapy. The study is recruiting at 30 centers in the United States and United Kingdom. One strategy is an “escalation” approach, in which individuals start taking a less-powerful therapy with the option of switching to a more potent one if disease activity continues. The other strategy involves starting with a strong therapy that is potentially more effective, but also carries greater risk for significant adverse effects. The “Determining the Effectiveness of Early Intensive versus Escalation Approaches for the Treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis” (DELIVER-MS) Trial is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Read more and participate

Clinical Trial: Coping and Adjusting to Living with MS (CALMS) Study

This study, Coping and Adjusting to Living with Multiple Sclerosis or CALMS, is looking at whether a telephone-based wellness program, called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Uncertainty Tolerance in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), is helpful for adults over the age of 18 who are experiencing uncertainty due to their recent MS diagnosis.

Read more and participate

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