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Research Studies: Newly Diagnosed with MS

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Introduction

Without the help of people with MS, it would be impossible to develop new and better treatment interventions, or to unravel the mysteries of this disease. Some researchers are specifically trying to understand what happens in the earliest stages of MS for clues to stopping or preventing it. Here are several studies seeking participants who are new to MS.

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Watch  Ask an MS Expert: MS Clinical Trials – What You Need to Know
Download Participating in Clinical Trials: A Guide for People with MS

Trial of Treatment Strategies to Prevent Disability - TREAT MS

A study based at Johns Hopkins University is comparing two treatment strategies in 900 people newly diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS, or with onset/diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS in the past who have received minimal or no treatment. The study is recruiting at approximately 45 centers nationwide. One option is an escalation approach, in which people start taking a less powerful therapy with the option of switching to a more potent therapy if disease activity continues. The other approach involves starting with a stronger therapy that is potentially more effective, but also carries the potential for greater risk for significant adverse effects. The “TRaditional versus Early Aggressive Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis” (TREAT-MS) Trial is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

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Trial of Treatment Strategies to Prevent Disability - DELIVER MS

A study based at the Cleveland Clinic and the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom) is comparing two treatment strategies in 800 people with relapsing-remitting MS diagnosed within the past five years who have never taken a disease-modifying therapy. The study is recruiting at 30 centers in the United States and United Kingdom. One strategy is an “escalation” approach, in which individuals start taking a less-powerful therapy with the option of switching to a more potent one if disease activity continues. The other strategy involves starting with a strong therapy that is potentially more effective, but also carries greater risk for significant adverse effects. The “Determining the Effectiveness of Early Intensive versus Escalation Approaches for the Treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis” (DELIVER-MS) Trial is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

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Exercise in Early Stage of MS

The Exercise Neuroscience Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is seeking for individuals diagnosed with MS for two years or less to participate in an online survey. This study's principal investigator is Professor Robert Motl, Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Professions, UAB. This survey aims to understand the factors influencing physical activity and exercise participation in persons in the early stage of MS across the country. Participation in this survey will remain completely anonymous and voluntary. It will take approximately 35 – 50 minutes to complete this survey.

Participants can take part in the survey, if you: 
1) are 18 years or older, and  
2) have a diagnosis of MS for two years or less, and 
3) are fluent in English, and
4) have internet access, and
5) willing to complete the survey.

If you want to participate in this survey, please follow the link:
https://uab.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bwRZy1IatWRf1wF

There will be some quick questions to assess your eligibility when you click the link.

For more information, please call 205-975-1306, or email Trinh (Lexi) Huynh at: enrl@uabmc.edu

More information is also available on our study’s website: https://sites.uab.edu/newlydiagnosedms/

The Psychosocial and Quality of life impact of multiple sclerosis in the first five years

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are researching how people who have recently been diagnosed with MS (within the last five years) adjust to the impact of MS-related changes on health and quality of life over time, and how social and personal resources affect their adjustment. If you would like to participate in this research study, you will be asked to complete a questionnaire. The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Participants must be age 18 or above and have been diagnosed with MS within the past 5 years. The researcher leading this study, Malachy Bishop, Ph.D., CRC can be reached at (email: mlbishop4@wisc.edu). To participate in the study, please see the link:

https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6z2K4s5i6HiMqIS

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Clinical Trial: Coping and Adjusting to Living with MS (CALMS) Study

This study, Coping and Adjusting to Living with Multiple Sclerosis or CALMS, is looking at whether a telephone-based wellness program, called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Uncertainty Tolerance in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), is helpful for adults over the age of 18 who are experiencing uncertainty due to their recent MS diagnosis.

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